Category Archives: True Crime

True Crime Wednesday: The Disappearance of Jodi Huisentruit

This is a case that drives home the fact that you can be vulnerable anywhere, even in the early hours of the morning when you’re doing something as innocent as trying to get to work. This case has always bothered me, because when 27-year-old news anchor Jodi Huisentruit disappeared, she wasn’t out partying or returning home from a late night with friends. She had overslept and was in a rush to get to her job at news station KIMT in Mason City, Iowa, where she hosted the early morning show. Jodi was an ambitious reporter who was focused and working hard on advancing her career. Her friends and co-workers described her as vivacious, friendly, motivated and energetic.

On the morning of June 27, 1995, Jodi didn’t show up for her 4 a.m. call, and a co-worker phoned her from the station to check on her. According to the co-worker, Jodi was awakened by the phone and said she would “be right there.” She only lived a few minutes from that station. But based on the evidence that was found a few hours later by police when Jodi didn’t show up for work, she never made it out of the parking lot. Jodi’s car was still there with they key bent in the lock on the driver’s side door. Tools she needed for work (a blow dryer, jewelry, shoes, etc.) were found scattered the ground. Drag marks near the car suggested a struggle, and that Jodi was most likely ambushed while she tried to get in her car. Neighbors later reported they heard screams in the early hours of the morning but no one called the police at that time. Someone else claimed to have seen a white van in the parking lot with its lights on around that same time.

The “Disappeared” episode on this case provided a lot of interesting information. The really eerie thing? Jodi’s employer, KIMT, had to report on their missing anchor, so it hit her co-workers hard. Watching news footage during that time, you can see how shell-shocked they are. Female anchors were also nervous because they were afraid there was a stalker out there who had known what time Jodi left for work each day and would strike again. There was another person of interest brought up during that episode. Jodi had a friend, an older gentleman who had wanted a relationship with her, but she had gently told him she wasn’t interested. He had lavished her with attention and gifts and even threw her a birthday party. After her disappearance, he went to the police and told them he was “the last person to see Jodi alive,” which was kind of bizarre, because no one knew if Jodi was deceased.

In 2011, a female police officer fired from the Mason City Police Department claimed that three members of the department had been personally involved in Jodi’s disappearance and had covered it up. This officer also filed a sexual harassment suit against the department and claimed to have been discriminated against based on her religion. Because she had a contentious relationship with the department, it’s hard to know if there is any truth to her claims, but you do have to wonder if she was fired for knowing too much.

There has never been any closure in this case, and Jodi was declared legally dead in 2001.

True Crime Wednesday: Kyle Fleischmann

I moved to the suburbs of Charlotte, N.C. in late 2003, and in 2007 I saw the original news stories when local resident, 24-year-old Kyle Fleischmann went missing. He has never been found and it’s a case that bothers me every time I think about it, mostly because it could have happened to anyone. How many times did I meet friends at bars when I was in my early 20s and walk in the dark to my car, alone? When you’re that age, you think you’re invincible. This case shows us our vulnerability. And also to be wary of walking alone, especially at night. It also inspired a flash-fiction short story I wrote several years ago.

Kyle is described by his friends and family as fun-loving, happy, and at a good place in his life. He had a nice job and had just moved into a condo in the trendy part of uptown Charlotte. On the night of Nov. 9, 2007, Kyle’s best friend organized an outing to see a Dane Cook concert (I believe his parents were there, too), and then the friends decided to end the evening with a stop at the Buckhead Saloon. I saw one interview where his friend said he saw Kyle talking to an attractive young woman at the bar, and he asked Kyle whether he was staying or leaving. Kyle opted to stay. Based on some reports I’ve read, surveillance footage caught a discussion between the guy the woman was with and a few of his friends. Kyle then exited the bar alone around 2 a.m. He left his jacket and debit card at the Buckhead Saloon, and went out into the cold night wearing only a t-shirt and jeans.

Here’s where the story gets strange. An employee at nearby Fuel Pizza claimed Kyle came in and ordered a few slices of pizza around 2:30 a.m. A little while later, he made calls to his parents, his best friend who was with him at the concert, his sister, and maybe one other person. He didn’t leave messages on any of those calls. He was never seen or heard from again.

When police investigators started searching for Kyle, they tracked his cell phone records. They could tell that when he made all the early-morning calls, he was walking through uptown and into what’s considered a bad part of the city. At some point after that, his phone went dead. Based on an interview with Kyle’s dad, Dick Fleischmann, that ran in Charlotte Magazine, Dick thinks Kyle is dead, and probably died that same night. He believes Kyle may have been intoxicated and tired and wandered into a bad part of town, where someone attempted to rob him. His theory is that Kyle’s body was left in what was then a construction site in that area. If this is what is happened, it is all the more sad because Kyle likely had nothing of value on him. He had left his debit card at the bar, must have used some cash to buy the pizza, but he probably didn’t have much more than a few dollars on him. Because wouldn’t he have used money or another credit card to call a cab?

To learn more, you can visit the Help Find Kyle Fleischmann Facebook page, where his father often posts.

 

True Crime Wednesday: The Disappearance of Zebb Quinn

In March of 2015 a newspaper article caught my eye online because it involved the disappearance of a couple in Leicester, N.C., which is near my hometown of Asheville. Cristie Codd and her husband J.T., who had only recently moved to the area, had gone missing from their home and no one could locate them. The disappearance made national headlines because Cristie, a celebrity chef, had starred on a season of the reality show “Food Network Star” and also made her living catering on film and TV sets. She met her husband, J.T., when the two both worked on the crew of the CBS show “Without a Trace.” The two were expecting their first child and had wanted to raise their family in the quiet and serene mountains of Asheville.

I kept track of the case for several days until a suspect’s name caught my eye—because I had heard it before connected to another disappearance in the Asheville area. Jason Owens had been questioned when Zebb Quinn, 18, went missing in January of 2000. But more in that later in this post.

A few days after the Codds’ disappearance, police picked up Owens, who had worked as a handyman for the Codds, after receiving reports from a local a resident grew suspicious of Owens throwing a large bags of items in a private dumpster. Upon examining the items, police discovered they belonged to Cristie Codd. When presented with the evidence, Owens claimed he had accidentally run over Cristie as he was trying to get his truck out of a ditch. However, this doesn’t explain the death of her husband. By the time police were able to get to Owens’ home and property, where they found charred remains of the couple in a wood stove, most evidence had all but been destroyed. Owens eventually pleaded guilty to three counts of second-degree murder and two counts of dismembering remains. He will serve a minimum of almost sixty years in prison for the crime.

Several years ago I watched an episode of Investigation Discovery’s show “Disappeared” that focused on Quinn. I immediately suspected his co-worker Jason Owens, because he told conflicting stories about the last night anyone saw Quinn. Quinn seemed like a nice guy who was probably too quick to trust people. Because he was interested in buying a new car, it sounds like Quinn had some cash on him when he went to peruse some used car lots after work. Guess who went with him? Jason Owens. The two were caught on a video camera at a local convenience store buying sodas after they left work at Wal-Mart.

Owens told police the two boys had taken separate cars on that errand, and that Zebb had received a page and made a call from a pay phone that upset him, prompting him to leave early. Supposedly when he sped away, he rear-ended Owens’ truck. What’s interesting is that hours later, Owens received treatment at a local hospital for fractured ribs and a head injury he told doctors happened in a second accident, one that he never filed an accident report for. Quinn’s car was found a few days later in a local restaurant parking lot, with the lights on and a puppy inside. Using red lipstick, someone had also drawn a pair of red lips on the back windshield. This reappearance of his car has never been explained.

After hearing Owens’ name come up in the Cristie and J.T. Codd case, my heart sank. I’ve suspected all along that Quinn was dead, and that he probably died the night of Jan. 2, 2000. My guess is that Owens tried to rob Quinn of the cash he had saved up and the two boys fought, or had an altercation that involved their cars. In March and May of 2015, investigators searched Owens’ property and a portion of a national forest in Asheville searching for evidence of Quinn’s remains. I haven’t heard anything about the results of those investigations, but Owens was indicted in the murder of Quinn in July of this year.

I hope Quinn’s family can find the closure they’ve been looking for, because this may be all that they ever get. I believe Owens is a coward and a thief who will probably never tell the truth about what happened to the Codds or Quinn. He likely robbed Quinn and my guess is that he was stealing from the Codds and they confronted him about it shortly before their deaths. I only wish investigators had been able to charge Owens for Quinn’s murder before another innocent family had to die.

True Crime Wednesday: The Disappearance of Maura Murray

When I first decided to start up my blog again I knew I wanted to designate one day to true crime posts. (Hey—I had to find some way of justifying my addiction to the unsolved/unresolved missing persons and cold cases, right?) For today’s post I had originally planned to talk about Kyle Fleischmann, a young man who disappeared in Charlotte, N.C. in 2007, but after I saw a new program scheduled to run on the Oxygen channel this weekend titled “The Disappearance of Maura Murray,” I changed my plans.

For those not familiar with the case, on the night of Feb. 9, 2004, Maura Murray e-mailed her college professors at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and employers and told them she needed to take a week off due to a death in her family. (This was later determined to be a lie). She researched renting a condominium in the mountains of New Hampshire. She left campus, withdrew most of the money in her bank account from an ATM, purchased alcohol at a liquor store, including a box of wine, and drove to Haverhill, New Hampshire, a few hours away. She crashed her car on a country road there around 7 p.m.

A school bus driver stopped to ask her if she needed help on his way home but she said, no, she had already called AAA for help. He drove to his home just a few houses away and placed a call to police. He doubted her story because the area had no cell service whatsoever.  By the time police arrived around 15 minutes later, there was no sign of Maura. Some of her possessions were found in the car, along with an empty bottle that appeared to have residual wine in it and the smashed up box of wine she had purchased at the liquor store. Her debit and credit cards and cell phone were missing. Maura was never seen again.

Disappearance of Maura Murray Sneak Peek 101: A Timeline of Events

I’ve listed to a few episodes of the Missing Maura Murray podcast , produced by Tim Pilleri and Lance Reenstierna, where they discuss different theories out there about Maura’s disappearance as well as a detailed timeline of the events leading up to the night she went missing. James Renner is another journalist who has a blog devoted to this case, My Search for Maura Murray, as well as a nonfiction book titled True Crime Addict: How I Lost Myself in the Mysterious Disappearance of Maura Murray.

I think people are fascinated with Maura’s case because on the surface, she looked like she had everything going for her. She was young, beautiful, athletic, intelligent, studying for a promising career in nursing. But Maura’s story goes much deeper than that. Scratch the surface a bit and secrets would be revealed, one by one. So many secrets and transgressions that when added up, could result in a person wanting to run away, disappear, or take their own life rather than be exposed.

Some of those secrets (from what I’ve been able to glean from news articles, podcasts, and television broadcasts of the case) are that Maura had been asked to leave West Point Academy, which she originally attended after graduating from high school, for an honor code violation. She transferred to the University of Massachusetts at Amherst to study nursing. While there, she got into trouble for using the credit card of someone who lived in her dorm to order food from a local restaurant. The day before she disappeared, she crashed her father’s brand-new car near campus around 3:30 a.m., causing a lot of damage. The next day, she put most of her belongings in boxes in her dorm room, e-mailed professors and her employer for the time off, researched condos in the mountains of New Hampshire and Vermont, and drove away. Then she crashed her car again around 7 p.m. that night. How could this girl not be scared that her world was caving in?

Some people theorize that a local resident snatched Maura as she stood outside of her car wondering how she was going to get out her second car accident in two days. Me? Personally I believe she panicked because she was probably going to get a D.U.I., and that, along with the rest of her troubles, was too much for her to handle. She probably grabbed what she needed and took off into the woods before police could arrive. She could have gotten disoriented in the woods and succumbed to the elements. I don’t really believe any of the theories that she faked her own disappearance and is living in Canada somewhere. It seems a little too far fetched to me. But, who knows? I could be wrong.

Do you have any theories about what could have happened to Maura Murray? Have you watched “The Disappearance of Maura Murray” or followed any of the blogs? Do you think the case will be cracked anytime soon?